65. THE RAILWAY STATION CLOCK. A clock hangs on the wall of a railway station, 71 ft. 9 in. long and 10 ft. 4 in. high. Those are the dimensions of the wall, not of the clock! While waiting for a train we noticed that the hands of the clock were pointing in opposite directions, and were parallel to one of the diagonals of the wall. What was the exact time?

SOLUTION TO 265. A PUZZLE FOR CARD-PLAYERS. (4/4) Show more

SOLUTION TO 265. A PUZZLE FOR CARD-PLAYERS. (3/4) Show more

SOLUTION TO 265. A PUZZLE FOR CARD-PLAYERS. (2/4) Show more

SOLUTION TO 265. A PUZZLE FOR CARD-PLAYERS. (1/4) Show more

265. A PUZZLE FOR CARD-PLAYERS. Twelve members of a club arranged to play bridge together on eleven evenings, but no player was ever to have the same partner more than once, or the same opponent more than twice. Can you draw up a scheme showing how they may all sit down at three tables every evening? Call the twelve players by the first twelve letters of the alphabet and try to group them.

SOLUTION TO 341. THE FOUR FROGS. (7/7) Show more

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...
puzzling to do it in only seven plays, any number of successive moves by one frog counting as one play. Of course, more than one frog cannot be on a toadstool at the same time. (2/2)

341. THE FOUR FROGS. In the illustration we have eight toadstools, with white frogs on 1 and 3 and black frogs on 6 and 8. The puzzle is to move one frog at a time,
in any order, along one of the straight lines from toadstool to toadstool, until they have exchanged places, the white frogs being left on 6 and 8 and the black ones on 1 and 3. If you use four counters on a simple diagram, you will find this quite easy, but it is a little more (1/2)

SOLUTION TO 151. THE JOINER'S PROBLEM. (2/2) Show more

SOLUTION TO 151. THE JOINER'S PROBLEM. (1/2) Show more

151. THE JOINER'S PROBLEM. I have often had occasion to remark on the practical utility of puzzles,
arising out of an application to the ordinary affairs of life of the little tricks and "wrinkles" that we learn while solving recreation problems.

The joiner, in the illustration, wants to cut the piece of wood into as few pieces as possible to form a square table-top, without any waste of material. How should he go to work? How many pieces would you require?

SOLUTION TO 197. THE COMPASSES PUZZLE. (4/4) Show more

SOLUTION TO 197. THE COMPASSES PUZZLE. (3/4) Show more

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