...
contain the same quantity of fluid. What proportion of spirits to water did the spirits of wine bottle then contain?" (2/2)

363. THE DOCTOR'S QUERY.
"A curious little point occurred to me in my dispensary this morning,"
said a doctor. "I had a bottle containing ten ounces of spirits of wine,
and another bottle containing ten ounces of water. I poured a quarter of an ounce of spirits into the water and shook them up together. The mixture was then clearly forty to one. Then I poured back a quarter-ounce of the mixture, so that the two bottles should again each (1/2)

SOLUTION TO 69. THE THREE VILLAGES. (2/2) Show more

SOLUTION TO 69. THE THREE VILLAGES. (1/2) Show more

69. THE THREE VILLAGES. I set out the other day to ride in a motor-car from Acrefield to Butterford, but by mistake I took the road going _via_ Cheesebury, which is nearer Acrefield than Butterford, and is twelve miles to the left of the direct road I should have travelled. After arriving at Butterford I found that I had gone thirty-five miles. What are the three distances between these villages, each being a whole number of miles? I may mention that the three roads are quite straight.

SOLUTION TO 236. THE HAT PUZZLE. (2/2) Show more

SOLUTION TO 236. THE HAT PUZZLE. (1/2) Show more

SOLUTION TO 400. THE MAGIC STRIPS. (3/3) Show more

SOLUTION TO 400. THE MAGIC STRIPS. (2/3) Show more

SOLUTION TO 400. THE MAGIC STRIPS. (1/3) Show more

...
piece containing a number, and the puzzle would then be very easy, but I need hardly say that forty-nine pieces is a long way from being the fewest possible. (3/3)

...
the numbers shall form seven rows and seven columns.

Now, the puzzle is to cut these strips into the fewest possible pieces so that they may be placed together and form a magic square, the seven rows, seven columns, and two diagonals adding up the same number. No figures may be turned upside down or placed on their sides--that is, all the strips must lie in their original direction.

Of course you could cut each strip into seven separate pieces, each (2/3)

400. THE MAGIC STRIPS. I happened to have lying on my table a number of strips of cardboard,
with numbers printed on them from 1 upwards in numerical order. The idea suddenly came to me, as ideas have a way of unexpectedly coming, to make a little puzzle of this. I wonder whether many readers will arrive at the same solution that I did.

Take seven strips of cardboard and lay them together as above. Then write on each of them the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, as shown, so that (1/3)

SOLUTION TO 172. MRS. SMILEY'S CHRISTMAS PRESENT. (2/2) Show more

SOLUTION TO 172. MRS. SMILEY'S CHRISTMAS PRESENT. (1/2) Show more

SOLUTION TO 427. PHEASANT-SHOOTING. (2/2) Show more

SOLUTION TO 427. PHEASANT-SHOOTING. (1/2) Show more

...
wing right in front of us. I fired, and two-thirds of them dropped dead at my feet. Then the duke had a shot at what were left, and brought down three-twenty-fourths of them, wounded in the wing. Now, out of those twenty-four birds, how many still remained?"

It seems a simple enough question, but can the reader give a correct answer? (2/2)

427. PHEASANT-SHOOTING. A Cockney friend, who is very apt to draw the long bow, and is evidently less of a sportsman than he pretends to be, relates to me the following not very credible yarn:--

"I've just been pheasant-shooting with my friend the duke. We had splendid sport, and I made some wonderful shots. What do you think of this, for instance? Perhaps you can twist it into a puzzle. The duke and I were crossing a field when suddenly twenty-four pheasants rose on the (1/2)

SOLUTION TO 139. THE DUTCHMEN'S WIVES. (8/8) Show more

Show more
Mathstodon

A Mastodon instance for maths people. The kind of people who make \(\pi z^2 \times a\) jokes.

Use \( and \) for inline LaTeX, and \[ and \] for display mode.