...
advanced. An exact equidistance for the three hands is not possible. Now, we want to know what the time will be when the three hands are next at exactly the same distances as shown from one another. Can you state the time? (2/2)

63. THE STOP-WATCH. We have here a stop-watch with three hands. The second hand, which travels once round the face in a minute, is the one with the little ring at its end near the centre. Our dial indicates the exact time when its owner stopped the watch. You will notice that the three hands are nearly equidistant. The hour and minute hands point to spots that are exactly a third of the circumference apart, but the second hand is a little too (1/2)

SOLUTION TO 133. THE FIVE BRIGANDS. (8/8) 

SOLUTION TO 133. THE FIVE BRIGANDS. (7/8) 

SOLUTION TO 133. THE FIVE BRIGANDS. (6/8) 

SOLUTION TO 133. THE FIVE BRIGANDS. (5/8) 

SOLUTION TO 133. THE FIVE BRIGANDS. (4/8) 

SOLUTION TO 133. THE FIVE BRIGANDS. (3/8) 

SOLUTION TO 133. THE FIVE BRIGANDS. (2/8) 

SOLUTION TO 133. THE FIVE BRIGANDS. (1/8) 

...
This problem, worded somewhat differently, was propounded by Tartaglia (died 1559), and he flattered himself that he had found one solution;
but a French mathematician of note (M.A. Labosne), in a recent work,
says that his readers will be astonished when he assures them that there are 6,639 different correct answers to the question. Is this so? How many answers are there? (3/3)

...
There are a good many equally correct answers to this question. Here is one of them:

A 6 × 12 = 72
B 12 × 3 = 36
C 17 × 1 = 17
D 120 × ½ = 60
E 45 × 1/3 = 15
___ ___
200 200

The puzzle is to discover exactly how many different answers there are,
it being understood that every man had something and that there is to be no fractional money--only doubloons in every case.
(2/3)

133. THE FIVE BRIGANDS. The five Spanish brigands, Alfonso, Benito, Carlos, Diego, and Esteban,
were counting their spoils after a raid, when it was found that they had captured altogether exactly 200 doubloons. One of the band pointed out that if Alfonso had twelve times as much, Benito three times as much,
Carlos the same amount, Diego half as much, and Esteban one-third as much, they would still have altogether just 200 doubloons. How many doubloons had each?
(1/3)

SOLUTION TO 386. A TRICK WITH DICE. 

...
example, if you threw 1, 3, and 6, as in the illustration, the result you would give me would be 386, from which I could at once say what you had thrown. (2/2)

386. A TRICK WITH DICE. Here is a neat little trick with three dice. I ask you to throw the dice without my seeing them. Then I tell you to multiply the points of the first die by 2 and add 5; then multiply the result by 5 and add the points of the second die; then multiply the result by 10 and add the points of the third die. You then give me the total, and I can at once tell you the points thrown with the three dice. How do I do it? As an (1/2)

SOLUTION TO 119. RACKBRANE'S LITTLE LOSS. 

...
was lost by Mr. Potts, and had the effect of doubling the money then held by his wife and the professor. It was then found that each person had exactly the same money, but the professor had lost five shillings in the course of play. Now, the professor asks, what was the sum of money with which he sat down at the table? Can you tell him? (2/2)

119. RACKBRANE'S LITTLE LOSS. Professor Rackbrane was spending an evening with his old friends, Mr. and Mrs. Potts, and they engaged in some game (he does not say what game) of cards. The professor lost the first game, which resulted in doubling the money that both Mr. and Mrs. Potts had laid on the table. The second game was lost by Mrs. Potts, which doubled the money then held by her husband and the professor. Curiously enough, the third game (1/2)

SOLUTION TO 112. A PUZZLING LEGACY. 

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