@Breakfastisready The trailer youtube.com/watch?v=82c2HDp-nt makes it look intriguing. And the fact that the Kindle version won't be released for a few more days is making me think it would be worth the wait to go for paper instead.

Reading this fantastic graphic novel called "Prime Suspects". It's all about analytic number theory in metaphors.

It has amazing one-liners like:

Today my advisor said:

Reading mathematics is like obesity. If you read too much, then it will only confuse you and will be harmful.

TeX in real world - poll 

TeX in real world - poll 

I guess I'm going to sulk about Indian politics for five more years. All my favorite candidates lost and I have a complete dislike for this re-elected ruling party. *sigh*

Okay, so it seems that the overwhelming majority feels that these jokes are sexist. But is there no way there could be a non-sexist version of these jokes?

I want opinion on this.

Are "that's what she said" jokes sexist? They could surely be perverted/vulgar/NSFW, but are they sexist?

Just want a fair assessment.

G2 shall be my favorite group! Well, for now. For a while. Or maybe for longer. It's the smallest of the exceptional Lie groups. Found 1893 by Élie Cartan. It was he who suggested to think about it in terms of rolling balls.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G2_%28ma

Picture two spheres, one three times larger than the other. Imagine them rolling on another without slipping nor twisting. Rolling surfaces have their own branch of mathematics: contact geometry!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contact_

#mathematics #maths #G2

Solution 

You know in Fantasia when Mickey teaches a broom to fetch water and then he falls asleep and the brooms go haywire and have poured enough water to flood the whole place and create a veritable indoor maelstrom?

That's what it feels like when you write some server automation software and you wake up next morning to see the mess your code wrought.

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Mathstodon

A Mastodon instance for maths people. The kind of people who make \(\pi z^2 \times a\) jokes.

Use \( and \) for inline LaTeX, and \[ and \] for display mode.