Some Fundamental Theorems in Mathematics
Article by Oliver Knill
In collection: Lists and catalogues
An expository hitchhiker's guide to some theorems in mathematics.
URL: math.harvard.edu/~knill/graphg
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Hierarchical Position Based Dynamics
Article by Faure, F. and Teschner, M.
In collection: Basically computer science
URL: matthiasmueller.info/publicati
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Three Thoughts on “Prime Simplicity”
Article by Michael Hardy
In collections: About proof, Integerology
In 2009, Catherine Woodgold and I published ‘‘Prime Simplicity’’, examining the belief that Euclid’s famous proof of the infinitude of prime numbers was by contradiction. We demonstrated that that belief is widespread among mathematicians and is false: Euclid’s proof is simpler and better than the frequently seen proof by...
URL: link.springer.com/article/10.1
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Mathematics with a metamathematical flavour.
Article by Timothy Gowers
In collections: About proof, The act of doing maths
Among the most fascinating results of mathematics are unprovability theorems, that is, rigorous proofs that certain statements cannot be deduced from certain axioms. A very famous example is Paul Cohen's demonstration that the continuum hypothesis cannot be deduced from the ZFC axioms . For this, Cohen invented...
URL: dpmms.cam.ac.uk/~wtg10/metamat
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

A Generalized Fibonacci LSB Data Hiding Technique
Article by Battisti, F and Carli, M and Neri, A and Egiaziarian, K
In collections: Basically computer science, Fibonaccinalia
URL: comlab.uniroma3.it/Marco/Artic
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

An Interesting Serendipitous Real Number
Article by John Ewing and Ciprian Foias
In collection: Fun maths facts
This is the story of a remarkable real number, the discovery of which was due to a misprint. Namely, in the mid-seventies, while Ciprian was at the University of Bucharest, one of his former students approached him with the following question: If \(x_1 \gt 0\) and \(x_{n+1} = \left(1 +...
URL: link.springer.com/chapter/10.1
PDF: link.springer.com/content/pdf/
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Fusible numbers and Peano Arithmetic
Article by Jeff Erickson and Gabriel Nivasch and Junyan Xu
In collection: Unusual arithmetic
Inspired by a mathematical riddle involving fuses, we define the "fusible numbers" as follows: \(0\) is fusible, and whenever \(x,y\) are fusible with \(|y-x|<1\), the number \((x+y+1)/2\) is also fusible. We prove that the set of fusible numbers, ordered by the usual order on...
URL: arxiv.org/abs/2003.14342v1
PDF: arxiv.org/pdf/2003.14342v1
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Beastly Numbers
In collection: Basically computer science
It seems unlikely that two computers, designed by different people 1800 miles apart, would be upset in the same way by the same two floating-point numbers 65535... and 4294967295... , but it has happened.
URL: cs.berkeley.edu/~wkahan/tests/
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Three-dimensional finite point groups and the symmetry of beaded beads
Article by Fisher, GL and Mellor, B.
In collections: Easily explained, Things to make and do, The groups group
URL: tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.108
PDF: myweb.lmu.edu/bmellor/beadedbe
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Programming quantum computers using 3-D puzzles, coffee cups, and doughnuts
Article by Simon J. Devitt
In collection: Unusual computers
The task of programming a quantum computer is just as strange as quantum mechanics itself. But it now looks like a simple 3D puzzle may be the future tool of quantum software engineers.
URL: arxiv.org/abs/1609.06628v1
PDF: arxiv.org/pdf/1609.06628v1
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

A New Rose : The First Simple Symmetric 11-Venn Diagram
Article by Mamakani, Khalegh and Ruskey, Frank
In collections: Art, Easily explained
A symmetric Venn diagram is one that is invariant under rotation, up to a relabeling of curves. A simple Venn diagram is one in which at most two curves intersect at any point. In this paper we introduce a new property of Venn diagrams called crosscut symmetry,...
URL: arxiv.org/abs/1207.6452
PDF: arxiv.org/pdf/1207.6452v1
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

A formula goes to court: Partisan gerrymandering and the efficiency gap
Article by Mira Bernstein and Moon Duchin
In collections: Protocols and strategies, Geometry
Recently, a proposal has been advanced to detect unconstitutional partisan gerrymandering with a simple formula called the efficiency gap. The efficiency gap is now working its way towards a possible landmark case in the Supreme Court. This...
URL: arxiv.org/abs/1705.10812v1
PDF: arxiv.org/pdf/1705.10812v1
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Chalk : Materials and Concepts in Mathematics Chalk in Hand
Article by Barany, Michael J and Mackenzie, Donald
In collections: Notation and conventions, The act of doing maths
URL: sps.ed.ac.uk/__data/assets/fil
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Solving Triangular Peg Solitaire
Article by Bell, George I.
In collections: Puzzles, Fun maths facts
We consider the one-person game of peg solitaire on a triangular board of arbitrary size. The basic game begins from a full board with one peg missing and finishes with one peg at a specified board location. We develop necessary and sufficient conditions for this game to be solvable. For all solvable...
URL: arxiv.org/abs/math/0703865v6
PDF: arxiv.org/pdf/math/0703865v6
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

Prime Number Races
Article by Andrew Granville and Greg Martin
In collections: Attention-grabbing titles, Easily explained, Fun maths facts, Integerology
This is a survey article on prime number races. Chebyshev noticed in the first half of the nineteenth century that for any given value of x, there always seem to be more primes of the form 4n+3 less than x then there are of the form 4n+1. Similar...
URL: arxiv.org/abs/math/0408319v1
PDF: arxiv.org/pdf/math/0408319v1
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

New entry!
Braids which can be plaited with their threads tied together at each end
Article by J.A.H. Shepperd
In collections: Fun maths facts, The groups group, Things to make and do
The group of braids, which can be plaited from n untwisted threads tied together at each end, is examined and its structure is determined. An algorithm is derived for deciding whether or not a given braid can be so plaited and a calculation procedure...
URL: royalsocietypublishing.org/doi
Entry: read.somethingorotherwhatever.

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