...
outward journey in the short time of ten minutes, though it took him an hour to get back to the starting point at Slocomb, with the wind dead against him. Now, how long would the ten miles have taken him if there had been a perfect calm? Of course, the hydroplane's engine worked uniformly throughout. (3/3)

...
Tommy replied, "it is true that in Ireland there are men of Cork and in Scotland men of Ayr, which is better still, but in England there are lightermen." Unfortunately it had to be explained to Mrs. Dobson, and this took the edge off the thing. The hydroplane flight was from Slocomb to the neighbouring watering-place Poodleville--five miles distant. But there was a strong wind, which so helped the airman that he made the (2/3)

72. THE HYDROPLANE QUESTION. The inhabitants of Slocomb-on-Sea were greatly excited over the visit of a certain flying man. All the town turned out to see the flight of the wonderful hydroplane, and, of course, Dobson and his family were there. Master Tommy was in good form, and informed his father that Englishmen made better airmen than Scotsmen and Irishmen because they are not so heavy. "How do you make that out?" asked Mr. Dobson. "Well, you see," (1/3)

SOLUTION TO 88. DIGITAL DIVISION. (7/7) 

SOLUTION TO 88. DIGITAL DIVISION. (6/7) 

SOLUTION TO 88. DIGITAL DIVISION. (5/7) 

SOLUTION TO 88. DIGITAL DIVISION. (4/7) 

SOLUTION TO 88. DIGITAL DIVISION. (3/7) 

SOLUTION TO 88. DIGITAL DIVISION. (2/7) 

SOLUTION TO 88. DIGITAL DIVISION. (1/7) 

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by 7 3 2 9 is just as correct for 2 as the other example we have given,
but the numbers are higher. (2/2)

88. DIGITAL DIVISION. It is another good puzzle so to arrange the nine digits (the nought excluded) into two groups so that one group when divided by the other produces a given number without remainder. For example, 1 3 4 5 8 divided by 6 7 2 9 gives 2. Can the reader find similar arrangements producing 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 respectively? Also, can he find the pairs of smallest possible numbers in each case? Thus, 1 4 6 5 8 divided (1/2)

SOLUTION TO 11. THE CYCLISTS' FEAST. 

...
'Twas found that two had sneaked outside and fled.
So, for two shillings more than his due share
Each honest man who had remained was bled.
They settled later with those rogues, no doubt.
How many were they when they first set out? (2/2)

11. THE CYCLISTS' FEAST.
'Twas last Bank Holiday, so I've been told,
Some cyclists rode abroad in glorious weather.
Resting at noon within a tavern old,
They all agreed to have a feast together.
"Put it all in one bill, mine host," they said,
"For every man an equal share will pay."
The bill was promptly on the table laid,
And four pounds was the reckoning that day.
But, sad to state, when they prepared to square, (1/2)

SOLUTION TO 134. THE BANKER'S PUZZLE. (3/3) 

SOLUTION TO 134. THE BANKER'S PUZZLE. (2/3) 

SOLUTION TO 134. THE BANKER'S PUZZLE. (1/3) 

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case not more than a pound in value), neither knowing what the other put in. Lastly, the customer was to transfer from the banker's counter to the box as many sixpences as the banker desired him to put in. The puzzle is to find how many sixpences the banker should first put in and how many he should ask the customer to transfer, so that he may have the best chance of winning. (2/2)

134. THE BANKER'S PUZZLE. A banker had a sporting customer who was always anxious to wager on anything. Hoping to cure him of his bad habit, he proposed as a wager that the customer would not be able to divide up the contents of a box containing only sixpences into an exact number of equal piles of sixpences. The banker was first to put in one or more sixpences (as many as he liked); then the customer was to put in one or more (but in his (1/2)

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Mathstodon

A Mastodon instance for maths people. The kind of people who make \(\pi z^2 \times a\) jokes. Use \( and \) for inline LaTeX, and \[ and \] for display mode.