Today I have had a lovely time writing a Numbas extension for graph theory.

@christianp
Very nice!

The grading for (d) seems to only count the "positive" checks (checking all of them gets marked correct); maybe there's not a nice way around that.

Is (h) correct? It doesn't seem to agree with (g).

@bmreiniger yeah, I have a proper marking algorithm for part d somewhere else that I need to copy over. And you are correct that I've got h wrong - I made an off-by-one error in my working-out and only fixed one occurrence

@christianp
Looks interesting
Can you suggest some interesting resources for learning maths? :ablobderpyhappy:

@mur2501 What have you tried? Where have you looked? What do you already know? How many hours a day or week are you able to commit? What topic or topics are you looking to learn?

"Maths" is a big topic, and it's impossible to recommend anything without know your starting point and target.

CC: @christianp

@ColinTheMathmo @christianp
I am in first year of Engineering so know kinda bit of maths like complex numbers, trigonometry, calculus and many other stuffs :ablobcaramelldansen:

I am not looking for a textbook or something which I will need to have a rigid schedule and stuffs to read.
It should be rather more on casual side (topic of math doesn't really matter, all math is great).
Also I don't like the formal complicated English used by all the maths textbook, so it would be good if it's also casual in language.

@mur2501 There's a difference between reading *about* maths versus reading how to *do* maths. There are lots of books on "Recreational Maths" that gets you into the problem solving spirit and the "Aha!" side. Things like "Get Smart: Maths" by Julia Collins, "Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension" by Matt Parker, and more. Many of these have been translated.

But if you want to learn how to *do* maths then you need to put in the time, effort, and work.

CC: @christianp

@ColinTheMathmo @christianp

Nah that's too much casual.
Something which just leans on the causual side then a textbook. Though I ready to do maths ofcourse :ablobcatangel:

@mur2501 OK, then I'd suggest these:

* Discrete Mathematics with Applications

* A Transition to Advanced Mathematics

The first will get you started on Discrete Maths, which is really useful in places you don't expect and will nicely complement your engineering maths.

The second is about proof and logical reasoning, which gets you into maths for maths sake, rather than "maths as a tool"

CC: @christianp

@ColinTheMathmo
I found multiple books of that names, which author you are pointing towards?

@christianp

@mur2501

"Discrete Mathematics with Applications" by Susanna S Epp

"A Transition to Advanced Mathematics" by Chartrand, Polimeni, and Zhang.

I'd also recommend:

"How to Think Like a Mathematician" by Kevin Houston.

CC: @christianp

@ColinTheMathmo
I try all of them out and maybe also share my experience with you then :D
Thankyou :ablobcatheartsqueeze:

@christianp

@mur2501 That would be great ... the first two are intended to be complementary. The Discrete Math book is actual subject material, the"Transition" is for coming up to speed with proof, reasoning, etc.

But I'd love to get your feedback on them.

CC: @christianp

@christianp sooo, can I ask about the accessibility of those graphs?

@pkra yep. Vertices have labels like "vertex labelled a" abd edges labels like "edge between a and b"

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