A 'sum' is a sequence of terms joined by addition.
A 'product' is a sequence of terms joined by multiplication.
Is there a general term for terms joined by a general associative operation, that mathematicians would know? Is it 'sequence'?
In Haskell this would be implemented as a fold, but what do you call the thing it acts on? 'Iterable' and 'Enumerable' are too computer-sciencey.
It's possible this question has no good answer.

@christianp I'd probably argue that "product" has a more general meaning in mathematics, even at school level (A level anyway). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Product_

More abstractly, associativity holds for semigroups and people talk about products there, too.

@pkra yeah, that's unfortunate, because it's such an overloaded term. If I say 'products', then a large portion of my readers will assume it doesn't include sums

@christianp also, I vaguely recall from getting my maths A level that "doing sums" was often used generically for "solve the problem" in the UK. Arguably, a long long time ago...

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@pkra I didn't know you had maths A level!
Yes, 'doing sums' is often used to mean any calculation.

@christianp indeed, I do. Good to know that my British English is not completely out of date (yet).

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