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:chalkdust_scorpion: Only 1 second until the launch of Chalkdust issue 11!

:chalkdust_scorpion: Ever wondered what maths is used to model wormholes? You can read about it in this article from issue 01 of Chalkdust. chalkdustmagazine.com/features

:chalkdust_scorpion: The cover of issue 05 featured a special curve known as a "dragon curve". Like so many other things in recreational maths, it was inspired by Martin Gardner. Read about it here chalkdustmagazine.com/regulars

:chalkdust_scorpion: The Jacobian. It can transform your variables, and might just save your life. Read Robert Smith?'s article from issue 02 to find out more chalkdustmagazine.com/features

:chalkdust_scorpion: .@el_timbre takes us through the invention of the equals sign, in this article from issue 02 chalkdustmagazine.com/features

:chalkdust_scorpion: A tesseract is the 4D analog of a cube. You can learn more about them in this article from our issue 06 archives, written by Lulu Beatson chalkdustmagazine.com/features

:chalkdust_scorpion: Do aliens exist? Eleanor takes a look at the equation that claims to offer an answer in this blog from the archives: chalkdustmagazine.com/blog/the

:chalkdust_scorpion: In this blog from our archives, @mscroggs talks about @henryseg's book on how 3D printing can help with our understanding of geometry! chalkdustmagazine.com/blog/vis

:chalkdust_scorpion: With all the filters people use, there is a great opportunity to teach them about some maths! Find out how in this blog from our archives by Lucy R-S chalkdustmagazine.com/blog/fou

:chalkdust_scorpion: John Nash was one of the 20th centuries most famous mathematicians. Read Pietro's biography from issue 02 here chalkdustmagazine.com/biograph

:chalkdust_scorpion: A fan of Tetris? This blog by Trupti from our archives introduces you to polyominoes! chalkdustmagazine.com/blog/pol

:chalkdust_scorpion: Let's take a look back at one of our previous summer projects where we consider how a gravity model can be used to examine human migration! chalkdustmagazine.com/blog/mat

:chalkdust_scorpion: The cover of issue 05 featured a special curve known as a "dragon curve". Like so many other things in recreational maths, it was inspired by Martin Gardner. Read about it here chalkdustmagazine.com/regulars

:chalkdust_scorpion: What is a p value? And what's wrong with them? @david_colquhoun explained all in issue 02! chalkdustmagazine.com/features

:chalkdust_scorpion: A tesseract is the 4D analog of a cube. You can learn more about them in this article from our issue 06 archives, written by Lulu Beatson chalkdustmagazine.com/features

:chalkdust_scorpion: In one of our most popular blogs from our archives, Anna explores how to make mathematical objects with crochet! chalkdustmagazine.com/blog/won

:chalkdust_scorpion: Run and collide into more raindrops... or just take it easy? This blog from our archives by Atheeta looks at what to do when you're caught in the rain! chalkdustmagazine.com/blog/bet

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