Big update: I'm officially graduating with B.Sc. in applied πŸŽ† 🎊

Very anxiously waiting for the graduation ceremony in less than 6 hours 😨

Still gunning for extra certification courses to narrow skill gaps though

First I've heard of the obscure Lill's method, but a fascinating way to solve a polynomial equation 🐒 youtube.com/watch?v=IUC-8P0zXe

To promote her book related to , Hannah Fry did a at the Royal Institution on the pros and cons of using an to make real-world decisions

youtube.com/watch?v=Rzhpf1Ai7Z

First time I heard of while perusing Twitter

Not a super popular hashtag, but as the translation suggests, aim is to make the most "uncomfortable" graph; seems open to interpretation (bizarre? freaky?)

Example that I copied (cockroach?): desmos.com/calculator/ksxomdhn

All these years and I'd never heard of the x/y-coordinate of a 2D-point described as the abscissa/ordinate until recently

Not sure if I'd be more attracted to or repulsed from maths if I were exposed to that terminology when beginning to learn graphs + calculus

"... This question is the subject of the β€œweak Pinsker conjecture,” which was first posed in the 1970s. Austin’s proof of the conjecture provides an elegantly intuitive lens through which to think about all manner of bewildering phenomena. He showed that at their heart, each of these dynamical systems is its own blend of chance and determinism."

quantamagazine.org/math-proof-

Update: *just* managed to squeeze the whole Completeness Theorem proof into the single lecture. Boy the construction process and the reasoning behind it are extremely tedious 😞

Our lecturer is about to lay out the proof for Gâdel's Completeness Theorem, and it's the first time I've heard any lecturer say that a proof *might* stretch across two lectures 😨

I did talk about this some time ago, but I found another person who shares similar gripes with the phrase "N times more/less than", and would rather just resort to "N times as much". So at least I know I'm not alone in this!

blogs.scientificamerican.com/r

Also, sampi isn't the fixed adopted symbol for this constant; I only picked it because it's not as overloaded as the other two, and "sampi" I think loosely means "like pi"

Any suggestions for a better representative symbol are welcome 😜

I know there are people who complain about Ο€ Day and Ο„ Day only working in a Month/Day format

Some time ago I jokingly introduced a contender "sampi":

Ο‘ ≑ Ο€/2 ≑ Ο„/4

So at least we could dedicate 15/7 as Sampi Day (ignoring the zero), celebrating the angle of orthogonality. And there are several notable properties of Ο‘ that (arguably) aren't as elegant with Ο€ or Ο„...

Maybe Mathstodon should have on 15th July?

Understanding :

"This will provide an in-depth understanding of the emotional roots of MA in primary and secondary children. The researchers will also characterize the relation of MA and general anxiety and links to mathematics performance, and develop robust MA questionnaires."

nuffieldfoundation.org/underst

I'm unsure if this lecturer intentionally planned to hold his midterm test on tomorrow πŸ€”

Probably gonna see Ο€ in Gaussian densities in some questions. Maybe even a question on estimating Ο€ via sampling?

"A pair of mathematicians has built on an obscure, 30-year-old mathematical theory to show that soap-filmlike minimal surfaces appear abundantly in a wide range of shapes."

quantamagazine.org/math-duo-ma

Yeesh, that test just now is another reminder of why I loathe exams that disallow help sheets

Sure, you can test me on how well I can apply theorems/algorithms to questions, but I can't additionally memorize that stuff by heart at all

It feels like an unnecessary penalty for my rubbish memory rather than an actual test of my skills

Matt Parker held his 2nd at the Royal Institution promoting some of the ideas/stories in his newest book:

invidio.us/watch?v=6JwEYamjXpA

Timothy Browning has discovered that
\[\begin{align}
33&=8866128975287528^3\\
&+(-8778405442862239)^3\\
&+(-2736111468807040)^3.
\end{align}\]

This settles all but one case of which two-digit numbers can be represented as a sum of three cubes. The remaining case is \(n=42\).

For more, see gilkalai.wordpress.com/2019/03 (where I found out about this) or en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sums_of_ (new article I wrote once I found out).

This particular thread on /r/math blew up: a Deputy is asking a question on behalf of an inmate who did a little personal investigation into some number theory

People really like the idea of the Deputy encouraging the inmate to dig deeper into the , and keeping him mentally stimulated + educated while in prison

reddit.com/r/math/comments/aye

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Mathstodon

A Mastodon instance for maths people. The kind of people who make \(\pi z^2 \times a\) jokes.

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