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Suggestions on resources to learn "pure" lambda calculus? The only resources I see on YouTube (for instance) are tech talks on how to implement it in various programming languages, but I'd like to learn about it detached from a particular implementation.

@kragen you may have advice for the post above, if I remember your interests correctly.
@acciomath

@emsenn @acciomath Bret Victor did a thing with alligator eggs: worrydream.com/AlligatorEggs/ but I learned it (more or less) by implementing it in Perl and then trying to understand how the Y-combinator worked. Raymond Smullyan wrote To Mock a Mockingbird, about the closely-related topic of conbinatory logic. Surely there's an OpenCourseWare syllabus or something that covers the λ-calculus in a pure sense?

@kragen I feel bad i tag you like once every few weeks but you always come in with what seems like a soooolid answer. @acciomath

@emsenn @acciomath It's okay! Go ahead and tag me more often if there's stuff I can help answer :)

@kragen @emsenn oh hey, I remember looking at that article a long time ago. (Bret Victor has some really cool ideas)

I'll take a look at the book, thanks!

@acciomath @emsenn I think I would have found combinatory logic entirely inscrutable without understanding the λ-calculus first; I haven't read the book

@acciomath I would just read the Wikipedia article and look at the further reading, e.g. "Introduction to Lambda Calculus" by Barendregt seems like a fine resource

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