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"We will not concern ourselves with subtle foundational issues (set-theoretic issues, universes, etc.). It is true that some people should be careful about these issues. But is that really how you want to live your life?"

I FEEL YA BRO

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Ooh, this is already getting interesting.

"Pathological examples are useful to know. On mountain highways, there are tall sticks on the sides of the road designed for bad weather. In winter, you cannot see the road clearly, and the sticks serve as warning signs: if you cross this line,you will die! Pathologies and (counter)examples serve a similar goal. They also serve as a reality check, when confronting a new statement, theorem, or conjecture, whose veracity you may doubt."

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Someone at work just asked me if I had ever been a teacher, because I seemed to like teaching subjects. When I told them I did in fact work as a teacher for a year, they said, "aha, I knew it!"

My teacherness... teacherosity? is evident. ^_^

Dang, this text has a very poetic title, "The Rising Sea", which refers to an oneiric metaphor of Grothendieck about how a nut of knowledge is slowly cracked by the slowness of an incoming ocean tide.

It also cites Morpheus from The Matrix in its preface, haha.

Now I really want to read this. I like poetical mathematics. Kinda like Ada Lovelace.

math.stanford.edu/~vakil/216bl

I kind of wonder if these foreign stereotypes really are that prevalent in fiction or if I'm just listing my own prejudices.

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German accent: evil scientist

Russian accent: evil spy

Spanish accent: evil drug lord

French accent: evil seductress

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Dammit, Jim, they're foreign, not necessarily criminal thugs.

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Pet peeve: fiction that uses foreign accents as a way to make villains stand out.

JordiGH boosted

And then they throw "mixed race" in there instead of "mixed ethnicity", oh bother.

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Oh, how interesting. This is on a British website, so they have a different breakdown of . They specifically distinguish between White British and White British because, well... people have died over this distinction.

I find the other breakdowns kind of interesting too, particularly the "Asian" breakdown, with specific detail given to the Indian subcontinent and everything else being two "others".

These categories are... I don't know... very culturally-dependent, I guess.

@OCRbot

I just wanted to pop a cold one and enjoy it in peace. :(

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I was wondering why my artisanal root beer tasted so bad. Then I noticed the label. It's got alcohol! Yuck!

And I bought a whole six pack of these. :(((

We keep calling "hellbug", like, "hey, let's go play hellbug" or "we'll do some more chores and then do some hellbug" and I was like, y'know what, fine, the game is now called hellbug.

$ mv 'Hollow Knight' hellbug

There, it's official.

Next time someone offers you a protip, ask them if they're an actual professional, and if they say no, tell them you're gonna report them for unlicensed protipping.

I think these methods are utterly alien to programmers. Ask another person?!?! Usually you ask the computer or the docs! What the heck is detexify? Look for extra context to guess?? The computer should know what the symbol means! Ask the computer!

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The way to know what symbols means are:

1) ask a human (mathematics is a social activity)

2) try something like detexify to at least get a common ASCII representation of the symbol

3) read around the text, maybe the symbol is defined earlier

4) read the references of the text, maybe something else in this field defines the symbol

5) try to guess from context what the symbol should mean (and sometimes authors just have typos and used the wrong symbol)

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Whereas with code you can just type in the error message into a search engine and you'll get a Stack Overflow response soon. (Woe betide you if you're trying to look up symbols in a regex, though, search engines can't usually handle those.)

There are ways to figure out what symbols means, but programmers are used to just typing into a computer to get answers. That doesn't usually work with mathematics.

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