I'm starting to think I could probably solve the shallow water wave equations in SQL.

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Well, as a first step, I've managed to to get the original code from Wikipedia running.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shallow_

I downloaded it a long time ago from the author's website, which I can't find again now. If you're curious, I can send you a copy:

(Plotted with and )

Now I just have to translate it to , haha!

It's an interesting situation. I have the source code for a free image, but it's not mine. Can I upload it to Wikipedia? Did the original author already give permission to the source code, since he gave permission to the image under the GFDL, which supposedly includes source code?

@JordiGH What. The. Heck?? This is insane! Are you sure this is possible in SQL, or even remotely worth it?

@Lofenyy It's not worth it, but I'm pretty sure it's possible! Windowing functions can loop and we have lots of other ways to branch.

The only problem is that defining your own windowing functions isn't easy.

You could also just go all the way to PL/SQL or PL/pgSQL, but that feels like cheating.

@JordiGH Interesting question but I bet the answer is going to be no. I think it actually hurts your case that the images in question are claimed to be released as public domain rather than under GFDL, because that eliminates any licensing consequences for related works.

@11011110 I noticed it was PD later. You're probably right. :-(

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